October Gardening Activities

Plant pansies, violas and snapdragons in mid-October for  fall and winter color. Ornamental kale, parsley, red mustard and Swiss chard are other great choices for containers and flower beds this time of year. winter container

  • Fruits and Nuts–Planting season for strawberries starts in South Alabama. Clean up orchard areas.
  • Shrubs–Shrub plantings can be made. Water when needed. Note varieties of camellias in bloom. Mulch shrubs that do not have mulch.
  • Lawns–Continue to mow lawns until no new growth is noticeable.
  • Roses–Continue insect and disease control practices.
  • Annuals and perennials–Visit flower shows and gardens. List desirable varieties of mums. clean up flower beds immediatlely after killing frost.
  • Bulbs–Plant tulips, hyacinths, daffodils,, crocuses, Dutch irises, anemones, and ranunculuses. Watch planting depth. Dig caladiums; clean and store in warm place.
  • Miscellaneous–Renew mulch around shrubs and rose beds. Loosen mulches that have packed down. Spray with oils before freezing weather to control insects. Remove all dead stems and trash from flower beds. Transplant into small pots any cuttings taken earlier.
  • Vegetable Seed–Plant turnips, mustard, kale, rape, spinach, and onion sets.

Source: Alabama Cooperative Extension System ANR-0047

September Gardening Activities

Watch for red Spider Lilies to appear like magic this month. You will see them in yards, along roads, in pastures, at old house places, and in some surprising places. They seem to strive on neglect!spider lily

  • Fruits and Nuts–New catalogs will be arriving soon. Start plans for future selection and planting. Take soil test for new planting areas. Fertilize established strawberry plantings.
  • Shrubs–Study landscape to determine plant needs. check early varieties of camellias. You may want to replace those damaged in spring by late freezes. After fall growth is completed, spray all shrubs with a fungicide.
  • Lawns–Plant seed of winter grasses where situation prevents planting permanent grasses. Winter seeds will appear soon. Stop fertilization three weeks before first frost.
  • Roses–Protect fall crops of blossoms from aphids and thrips. Keep plants health.
  • Annuals and Perennials–Last chance for planting perennials and biennials. Old clumps of perennials may be divided. Plant peonies.
  • Bulbs–Spring flowering bulbs may be planted late this month in North Alabama. Delay planting in South Alabama.
  • Miscellaneous–Clean up infestations of insects on azaleas, camellias, boxwoods, gardenias, hollies, etc. If oil spray is needed, don’t use in freezing weather. Build compost bin or box; leaves will be falling soon. Move houseplants indoors.
  • Vegetable Seed–Plant hardy vegetables and root crops.
  • Vegetable Plants–Plant cabbage, collards, cauliflower, celery, Brussels sprouts, and onion sets.

Source: Alabama Cooperative Extension  ANR-0047

August Gardening Activities

 pink flowersHave you noticed the pink flowers–Naked Ladies–that pop up in gardens everywhere late in July and early August? These are Lycoris squamigera that bloom on two foot tall stems with with foliage that appears later. The hottest days of summer have arrived but there are still chores we can do in our gardens. Just get outside early in the day and keep hydrated.
  • Fruits and Nuts–Cut out old blackberry canes after fruiting and then fertilize and cultivate for replacement canes. remember to order new catalogs for fruit selection.
  • Shrubs–Layer branches of hydrangea to propagate.
  • Lawns–Watch for diseases. Mow regularly. Water as needed.
  • Roses–Keep roses healthy and actively growing. Hybrid teas and floribundas may need light pruning to prevent scraggly appearance.
  • Annuals and perennials–Water as needed. Plant perennials and biennials.
  • Bulbs–Divide old iris plantings and add new ones.
  • Miscellaneous–Keeping flowers, shrubs, trees, and lawns health is the major task this month. This means close observation for insects and diseases. Water.
  • Vegetable Seed–Plant turnips, rutabagas, beans, and peas in South Alabama.
  • Vegetable Plants–Plant cabbage, collards, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, and celery.

Source: Alabama Cooperative Extension ANR-0047

July Gardening Activities

You can’t beat vegetables fresh from the garden. Don’t forget to plant pumpkins the first week of July for fall harvest.   

  • Fruits and Nuts–Protect figs and other ripening fruit from birds.
  • Shrubs–Continue to root shrub cuttings until late in the month and mulch to keep soil moist.
    Remove faded blooms promptly from crape myrtle and other summer-blooming plants.
  • Lawns–Watch for diseases. Mow regularly. Water as needed.
  • Roses–Keep roses healthy and actively growing. Apply fertilizer. Wash off foliage to prevent burning if any fertilizer falls on plants. Water as needed.
  • Annuals and Perennials–Water as needed to keep plants active.
  • Bulbs–Iris and spider lilies may be planted late this month.
  • Miscellaneous–Keeping flowers, shrubs, trees, and lawns health is the major task this month. Watch closely for insects and diseases. Water.
  • Vegetable Seed–Plant beans, field peas, rutabagas, squash, New Zealand spinach, and Irish potatoes. Plant cabbage, collards, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, and celery for the fall crop.
  • Vegetable Plants–Plant tomatoes in Central and North Alabama.

Source: Alabama cooperative Extension ANR–0047

June Gardening Activities

June is the month to enjoy daylilies, hydrangeas and other perennials and annuals in our flower gardens.

  • Fruits and nuts–Layer grapes and continue spray programs. Thin apple and peach trees.
  • Shrubs–Fertilize now. Keep long shoots from developing by pinching off tips.
  • Annuals and Perennials–Remove old flower heads to promote continued flowering. Watch for insects and diseases.
  • Bulbs–Foliage may be removed from spring flowering bulbs if it has yellowed and is becoming dry.
  • Vegetable Seed–Plant beans, field peas, pumpkins, squash, corn, cantaloupes and watermelons.
  • Vegetable plants–Plant tomatoes, peppers, eggplants and sweet potato vine cuttings.

Source:  Alabama Cooperative Extension System ANR-0047

 

 

May Gardening Activities

This month many flowers and perennials are looking their best. Enjoy the flowers and get those annuals and pink iris bloom up closevegetables planted. Iris are blooming this month and come in a variety of colors including a peachy pink.

  • Shrubs–Newly planted shrubs need extra care now and in coming weeks. Don’t forget to water them.
  • Roses–Spray for insects and diseases. Fertilize monthly based on soil test. Container-grown plants in flower may be planted now. Prune climbing roses after the first big flush of flowering.
  • Bulbs–Summer bulbs started in containers can be planted now. Don’t remove foliage from spring flowering bulbs. Do not let seedheads form on tulips and other spring flowering bulbs.
  • Vegetables–Plant seedlings of tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, sweet potatoes, vegetable seeds.

 

Source:  Alabama Cooperative Extension System ANR-0047

 

April Gardening Activities

April is the time to take a drive and enjoy the azaleas that will be blooming throughout the month. With the wonderful spring weather we are all ready to get outside and work in our flower gardens and get the vegetable gardens started. Just be sure to wait until after the last average frost for your area to set out those summer annuals and tender vegetables.

  • Fruits and Nuts–Start spray program for all fruits. Plant raspberries and blackberries.bright pink azalea
  • Shrubs–Fertilize azaleas and camellias. When new growth is half-completed, spray all shrubs with a fungicide.
  • Roses–Watch for insects and diseases. Remove old flower heads. Plant container-grown plants.
  • Bulbs–Plant gladiolus, fancy-leaved caladiums, milk and wine lilies and ginger and gloriosa lilies.
  • Miscellaneous–On camellias and hollies look for scale insects and spray if necessary. Carefully water newly planted of shrubs and trees.
  • Summer annuals may be set out late this month in central and southern parts of Alabama.
  • Vegetable seed–Plant tender vegetables such as beans, corn, squash, melons and cucumbers.
  • Vegetable plants–Plant tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, sweet potatoes and parsley.

Source: Alabama Cooperative Extension System ANR-0047

March Gardening Activities

Daffodils, forsythia and flowering quince are among the flowers making an appearance this month.

FLOWERING QUINCE

FLOWERING QUINCE

  • Fruits and Nuts–Continue strawberry and grape plantings. Start planting blackberries.
  • Bulbs–Plant cannas, amaryllis, gladiolus and zephyranthes in South Alabama; delay planting a few weeks in North Alabama.
  • Shrubs–Fertilize shrubs (except azaleas and camellias) according to a soil test. Plant transplants. Watch shrubs for harmful insects.
  • Lawns–Fertilize established lawns.
  • Roses–Watch new growth for aphids. Begin a spray or dust program. Begin fertilizing.
  • Vegetable plants– Plant cabbage, onions, lettuce, broccoli and Brussels sprouts in North Alabama, and plant tomatoes and peppers in lower South Alabama

Source:  Alabama Gardener’s Calendar ANR-0047

February Gardening Activities

Bright yellow crocus and other early blooming plants will soon announce that spring is on its way. If you do not have crocus in your garden be sure to plant some next Fall.

  • Planting season continues for dormant trees, shrubs, roses. You may plant some vegetable seeds such as collards and Swiss chard as well as vegetable transplants including cabbage, onions, lettuce, broccoli, Brussels spouts, and strawberries.
  • Prepare beds for summer annuals.
  • Fertilize fruit trees, fertilize grape at half rate now and half after fruit sets.
  • Spray shrubs with fungicide before new growth starts.

yellow crocus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source:   Alabama Cooperative Extension System Publication ANR-0047

Late Winter Blooms

Even with the cold temperatures in late winter is your garden showing signs of the coming spring? Have your crocuses and daffodils announced themselves yet? Do you have lenten rose blooming and buds on your old garden quince? If not, you should consider planting these and you will be excited when they show up and tell you  that Spring really is on the way!

Trisha Williams