June Gardening Activities

June is the month to enjoy daylilies, hydrangeas and other perennials and annuals in our flower gardens.

  • Fruits and nuts–Layer grapes and continue spray programs. Thin apple and peach trees.
  • Shrubs–Fertilize now. Keep long shoots from developing by pinching off tips.
  • Annuals and Perennials–Remove old flower heads to promote continued flowering. Watch for insects and diseases.
  • Bulbs–Foliage may be removed from spring flowering bulbs if it has yellowed and is becoming dry.
  • Vegetable Seed–Plant beans, field peas, pumpkins, squash, corn, cantaloupes and watermelons.
  • Vegetable plants–Plant tomatoes, peppers, eggplants and sweet potato vine cuttings.

Source:  Alabama Cooperative Extension System ANR-0047

 

 

May Gardening Activities

This month many flowers and perennials are looking their best. Enjoy the flowers and get those annuals and pink iris bloom up closevegetables planted. Iris are blooming this month and come in a variety of colors including a peachy pink.

  • Shrubs–Newly planted shrubs need extra care now and in coming weeks. Don’t forget to water them.
  • Roses–Spray for insects and diseases. Fertilize monthly based on soil test. Container-grown plants in flower may be planted now. Prune climbing roses after the first big flush of flowering.
  • Bulbs–Summer bulbs started in containers can be planted now. Don’t remove foliage from spring flowering bulbs. Do not let seedheads form on tulips and other spring flowering bulbs.
  • Vegetables–Plant seedlings of tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, sweet potatoes, vegetable seeds.

 

Source:  Alabama Cooperative Extension System ANR-0047

 

April Gardening Activities

April is the time to take a drive and enjoy the azaleas that will be blooming throughout the month. With the wonderful spring weather we are all ready to get outside and work in our flower gardens and get the vegetable gardens started. Just be sure to wait until after the last average frost for your area to set out those summer annuals and tender vegetables.

  • Fruits and Nuts–Start spray program for all fruits. Plant raspberries and blackberries.bright pink azalea
  • Shrubs–Fertilize azaleas and camellias. When new growth is half-completed, spray all shrubs with a fungicide.
  • Roses–Watch for insects and diseases. Remove old flower heads. Plant container-grown plants.
  • Bulbs–Plant gladiolus, fancy-leaved caladiums, milk and wine lilies and ginger and gloriosa lilies.
  • Miscellaneous–On camellias and hollies look for scale insects and spray if necessary. Carefully water newly planted of shrubs and trees.
  • Summer annuals may be set out late this month in central and southern parts of Alabama.
  • Vegetable seed–Plant tender vegetables such as beans, corn, squash, melons and cucumbers.
  • Vegetable plants–Plant tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, sweet potatoes and parsley.

Source: Alabama Cooperative Extension System ANR-0047

March Gardening Activities

Daffodils, forsythia and flowering quince are among the flowers making an appearance this month.

FLOWERING QUINCE

FLOWERING QUINCE

  • Fruits and Nuts–Continue strawberry and grape plantings. Start planting blackberries.
  • Bulbs–Plant cannas, amaryllis, gladiolus and zephyranthes in South Alabama; delay planting a few weeks in North Alabama.
  • Shrubs–Fertilize shrubs (except azaleas and camellias) according to a soil test. Plant transplants. Watch shrubs for harmful insects.
  • Lawns–Fertilize established lawns.
  • Roses–Watch new growth for aphids. Begin a spray or dust program. Begin fertilizing.
  • Vegetable plants– Plant cabbage, onions, lettuce, broccoli and Brussels sprouts in North Alabama, and plant tomatoes and peppers in lower South Alabama

Source:  Alabama Gardener’s Calendar ANR-0047

February Gardening Activities

Bright yellow crocus and other early blooming plants will soon announce that spring is on its way. If you do not have crocus in your garden be sure to plant some next Fall.

  • Planting season continues for dormant trees, shrubs, roses. You may plant some vegetable seeds such as collards and Swiss chard as well as vegetable transplants including cabbage, onions, lettuce, broccoli, Brussels spouts, and strawberries.
  • Prepare beds for summer annuals.
  • Fertilize fruit trees, fertilize grape at half rate now and half after fruit sets.
  • Spray shrubs with fungicide before new growth starts.

yellow crocus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source:   Alabama Cooperative Extension System Publication ANR-0047

Late Winter Blooms

Even with the cold temperatures in late winter is your garden showing signs of the coming spring? Have your crocuses and daffodils announced themselves yet? Do you have lenten rose blooming and buds on your old garden quince? If not, you should consider planting these and you will be excited when they show up and tell you  that Spring really is on the way!

Trisha Williams

 

 

January Gardening Activities

January is a great time to do your garden tool maintenance–clean, oil and sharpen tools. You may also want to do a soil test in preparation for the growing season. tool display

  • Fruits–Set out apples, peaches, pears, and grapes, prune dormant trees.
  • Shrubs–Plant shrubs and trees. Spray deciduous shrubs with dormant oil spray to control disease and insects. Choose a day when weather warms.
  • Lawns–Soil test before setting up a fertility program.
  • Roses–Visit nurseries to select varieties and start planting. planted.
  • Annuals and perennials–Plant hardy annuals.
  • Bulbs–Lilies, except Madonna, may be planted. Check stored bulbs and discard rotten ones. Make indoor plantings of amaryllis, callas, and gloxinias.
  • Miscellaneous–Prune winter-damaged limbs. Give houseplants a bath in lukewarm water to remove dust.
  • Vegetable Seed–Plant hardy vegetables, root crops, and tubers in southern-most areas. Plant lettuce, cabbage, and broccoli in cold frames.
  • Vegetable Plants–Set out cabbage plants.

Source: Alabama Cooperative Extension ANR-0047

 

 

 

 

 

December Garden Activities

Try forcing paper whites as a way to enjoy gardening during the winter.  December is a great month for armchair gardening. You can enjoy the seed and perennial catalogs and start planning your spring garden.paperwhites in bloom

  • Fruits and Nuts–Plant young pecan and other deciduous fruit trees and grapes. Select budwood. Start dormant pruning of established fruits. Protect all young trees from rabbit damage by placing wire around the base of the tree. Put on dormant oil sprays for scale.
  • Shrubs–Planting is still the main activity but delay in case of freezing weather.
  • Lawns–Control wild garlic, chickweed, poa annua, dandelion, and other weeds. Read label on each can of weed killer used.Roses–add plants to rose garden. Mulch all plantings.
  • Annuals and Perennials–Plant hardy annual seed without delay. Have you tried violas?
  • Bulbs–continue spring bulb planting.
  • Miscellaneous–Shrubs, trees and indoor plants make excellent gifts.

Source:  Alabama Cooperative Extension ANR-0047

November Gardening Activities

Plants bulbs this month for spring color. Other gardening tasks for November include planting hardy annuals such as larkspur, poppies, pansies and candytuft. This is also a great time to plant trees, shrubs, vines, and roses. Take a drive and enjoy the glorious fall colors.

yellow ginkgo leaves falling to the ground
Ginkgo leaves in the fall
  • Fruits and Nuts–Select sites for plantings. start mulching strawberries, blackberries, and grapes.
  • Shrubs–Plant shrubs, trees, and vines.
  • Lawns–Some homeowners like lawn paints. Have you thought about having a green lawn this winter? Use proper herbicide to kill germinating winter weeds.
  • Roses– Get rose planting underway. Use a soil test as a basis for fertilization. Look for new varieties.
  • Annuals and Perennials–Plant hardy annuals such as larkspur, poppies, pansies, and candytuft. Get sweet peas into the ground.
  • Bulbs–Continue spring bulb planting. Put lilies of the valley in a shady place.
  • Miscellaneous–Plant screen plantings for a privacy on patio.
  • Vegetable Seed– Plant cabbage and lettuce in a coldframe.

Source: Alabama Cooperative Extension System ANR-0047

 

 

Try a Cold Frame

A simple cold frame as pictured here is used as picture of a cold framea miniature greenhouse to protect tender plants from cold, grow plants such as lettuce, spinach, and radishes through the winter and to start transplants for spring gardens. The cold frame pictured was built by a Master Gardener from lumber and has a recycled glass storm door for the cover. Some are built from concrete blocks. In very cold weather an old quilt, blanket or straw can be used to cover it and help hold the heat. Some gardeners use a remote thermometer to check the temperature. When we have warm days the top will need to be propped open to regulate the temperature.

Trisha Williams