Great Workday in the Demo Garden.

Chilton County Master Gardeners showed up and showed out for our Monday Demo Garden workday! There were 14 of us (one non member-Treasia Bennett’s willing spouse) to dig, divide and replant or pot up daylilies, prune roses; dig up and replant dwarf azaleas; clean out the Herb bed; trim the vines in the shade garden; put out pine straw, and prune the box woods in the Knot Garden. Several of our interns and newly certified members have agreed to be in charge of some of our beds and areas. They are Patty Frye, Gail Brooks, Joan Crocker, and Sharon Hosch (helping Betsy Smith). As always, ANY of our members are encouraged to come out and help when you can. Our work days this fall will be cut to one instead of two, which will be on Thursdays, 8-10a.m., weather permitting.
Photos by Audrey Giles (not pictured).

Alice Broome and Larry Jones working in the Storage Shed Garden

Finally Back Together!!

Masked and socially distanced, Chilton County Master Gardeners met at Goosepond Park Pavilion on October 13 for the first time since the March Covid 19 shutdown. It was a day to celebrate meeting again and a day of congratulations. Four of our Interns have completed volunteer hours for certification and three were present to receive their badges and certificates. Congratulations to Patricia Agee, Gail Brooks, Jim Rabey and Linda Church (not present)!

A highlight of our meeting was the presentation of the 2020 AMGA Garry Murray Award for Outstanding Service and Dedication to our own County Extension Coordinator, Gay West. Gay has been exceptionally supportive of the ACES Master Gardener Training Program and of the Chilton County Master Gardeners Association. Thanks to Sondra Henley and Harriett Jackson for nominating Gay for this award.
Photos/ Diane Clapp
Article/ Trisha Williams

Fall Demo Garden Cleanup

Another great workday at the Demonstration Garden! Thanks to all the interns that turned out and some of our regular members too. Got a huge yucca plant dug up, divided, and relocated (thanks to John Higginbotham and Ron Herbster); moved an aster, dug and divided some hostas and took some home to pot up for plant sales, pulled MORE nut grass (and sprayed some too), spread some mulch, pruned some roses, filled bird baths, and cleaned out the keyhole garden. A VERY good morning! Photos by Diane Clapp & Audrey Giles

Extension Office Cleanup!

A few years ago, the Chilton County Master Gardeners took over the landscape around the C.C. Extension Office. The appearance around the building (former Health Office) has really improved. Former President Sondra Henley was the one who spearheaded this project and this year she is the Extension Office Committee Chairman. Today was a beautiful day for her and some of our Interns to work on pruning and cleaning up all the landscaping around the building and around the sign. And for the interns to get some hours they’ve been missing since the COVID shutdown.
Photo by Audrey Giles

Interns cleaning at E.O.
L-R Sharon Hosch, Patty Frye, Ruby Moberg, Sondra

October Gardening Activities

Plant pansies, violas and snapdragons in mid-October for  fall and winter color. Ornamental kale, parsley, red mustard and Swiss chard are other great choices for containers and flower beds this time of year. winter container

  • Fruits and Nuts–Planting season for strawberries starts in South Alabama. Clean up orchard areas.
  • Shrubs–Shrub plantings can be made. Water when needed. Note varieties of camellias in bloom. Mulch shrubs that do not have mulch.
  • Lawns–Continue to mow lawns until no new growth is noticeable.
  • Roses–Continue insect and disease control practices.
  • Annuals and perennials–Visit flower shows and gardens. List desirable varieties of mums. clean up flower beds immediatlely after killing frost.
  • Bulbs–Plant tulips, hyacinths, daffodils,, crocuses, Dutch irises, anemones, and ranunculuses. Watch planting depth. Dig caladiums; clean and store in warm place.
  • Miscellaneous–Renew mulch around shrubs and rose beds. Loosen mulches that have packed down. Spray with oils before freezing weather to control insects. Remove all dead stems and trash from flower beds. Transplant into small pots any cuttings taken earlier.
  • Vegetable Seed–Plant turnips, mustard, kale, rape, spinach, and onion sets.

Source: Alabama Cooperative Extension System
Alabama Gardening Calendar

More Interns Finish their tests!

Due to the Covid-19 Stay at Home order, the 2020 Chilton County Master Gardener class members have been studying and completing tests on the remaining class topics at home. The ones shown below have all turned in their tests and passed with flying colors! Once we can hold classes again we will reschedule the remaining classes. We look forward to the time when they can join our association members in MG and Extension activities and complete certification requirements.

Congratulations MG Class

Due to the Covid-19 Stay at Home order, the 2020  Chilton County Master Gardener class members have been studying and completing tests on the remaining class topics at home. Once we can hold classes again we will reschedule the remaining classes. We look forward to the time when they can join our association members in MG and Extension activities and complete certification requirements. Congratulations to Patricia Agee, Gail Brooks, Linda Church, Joan Crocker, Julie Garris, Sharon Hosch, Peggy McGraw, Ruby Moberg, Jane Rabey and Jim Rabey for completing and passing all their tests!

Helping With the Beef Cook-Off

Last Friday, March 6, Chilton County Master Gardeners and interns helped with registering the participants at the 4-H Beef Cookoff, which is sponsored by the Chilton County Extension Office and the Chilton County Farmers Federation.
L to R- Interns Linda Church, Karol Collier M.G. Harriett Jackson, Interns Jane Rabey, Jim Rabey, and Julie Garris. Not pictured, MG Pat Farmer.

Wonderful Japanese Maples

Japanese maples, what a wonderful topic for a rainy March day! Our speaker for our Chilton County Master Gardener meeting was David Doggett, a Jefferson County Master Gardener and volunteer at Aldridge Gardens, who grows over 70 cultivars of Japanese maples at his home in Irondale. He discussed choosing a site, selecting a variety, companion plants and planting. David has donated and planted 51 (48 cultivars) Japanese maples at Aldridge Gardens.

There are cultivars to meet the needs of most gardeners: small or taller, upright or weeping, fine leaved or more coarse, textured leaves or smooth. Colors often vary from season to season but include reds, pinks, light greens, apricot, yellow, darker greens and more.